Process Servers Network

With just a couple of clicks of the mouse or a telephone call, your service of process can be out for service within an hour! We have been a professional process servers network leading our industry in integrity and reliability. In contrast to the majority of our process server competitors, you will find there’s a complete staff waiting by the phone to help you with your task. We make use of our own state-of-the-art on-line process service system, designed by clientele needs. is actually a unification of wireless, electronic mail and online systems which will provide immediate alert of services carried out from the field and permits on-line access to status reviews, duplicates of affidavits and statements on all of your services, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.    

Service Of Process Explained

“Service of process” is a legal term for the method by which a defendant is notified of an initial legal action. In the US, service of process is so critical that a lawsuit can’t begin unless service is completed properly. Generally, service of process is completed by delivering a set of documents to whoever needs to be served. Every jurisdiction has its own definition of what counts as service of process, and the documents required can include an initial complaint or a formal summons issued by the court. In any case, the point is to notify a party that legal proceedings have begun and establish the court’s “personal jurisdiction” over all the parties involved in the lawsuit. The important part is that Plaintiffs can’t serve process themselves. Process can be served, however, by anybody over the age of 18 who isn’t involved in the litigation. Usually, process servers are required to deliver the appropriate documents to an authorized recipient in person, by hand, rather than through the mail or in an e-mail. Once process is served, the defendant is legally able to participate in the proceedings, including appearances before the court. If they fail to respond appropriately, the court can find them in default and ultimately award the plaintiff relief.